Shark Bytes

This blog is an area for project participants to collaborate, share ideas, ask questions, etc.

Monday, February 05, 2007

My students had a blast working on Sharkbytes!
I used this project as an ACCELERATED project for three of my high-level grade 2 students.
In following the UDL model, I allowed the students the opportunity to approach the task in any way they wanted. They were very independent in their method. The students organized themselves and decided which resources and books to read after visiting the school library. They independently searched for a movie or video that was beneficial to them. And, with guidance, they determined which internet sites provided the best information to address the topic. The students were so focused that they even set up study dates on the weekend so that they could have longer learning blocks. This project was incredibly motivating to these three students! Their posters and powerpoints were the backdrops of their extraordinary ORAL PRESENTATION! Please read the student generated project introduction!

My friends and I accomplished this shark project with much effort and hard work. First, we met and discussed what we already knew about sharks. Then we decided for ourselves which particular shark we would research. We did separate projects about our own sharks using books, videos, and websites of our own choosing. We also used a lot of our own background knowledge. I researched the Great White Shark, Evan studied the Mako Shark, and Jessie worked on the Hammerhead Shark. We presented our initial findings about our particular sharks to our classmates. We used posters, notes and a powerpoint show to share our information. Next, we put together our ideas and made a second BIGGER presentation about the main question: What would the ocean be like without sharks? To answer this question, we read books, went on the Internet to learn about shark conservation, and then we came up with our own theories. Then we made another Powerpoint and a different poster and presented them to the class. Here are samples of our work and of course, the answer to the “Essential Question!”
http://kids-learn.org/sharkbytes/nash/nash.htm